Boston, MA – Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Study Group have found that approximately one third of the population has variations in a specific gene that renders them unable to metabolize properly clopidogrel, one of the most commonly prescribed anti-platelet medications.  Compared to people who did not have the variants in the cytochrome P-450 2C19 (CYP2C19) gene, those who possessed the variants had lower levels of the active metabolite of clopidogrel, less inhibition of platelets, and a significantly higher risk for major adverse cardiovascular events such as death, heart attack, stroke, and stent thrombosis (a serious blood clot formation following a stenting procedure).  The findings appear today as an advance on-line publication for the New England Journal of Medicine.

Read more...

Security concerns are one of the key obstacles to the adoption of new non-volatile main memory (NVMM) technology in next-generation computers, which would improve computer start times and boost memory capacity. But now researchers from North Carolina State University have developed new encryption hardware for use with NVMM to protect personal information and other data.

Read more...

Neuherberg-- The cooperation between the Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen and Boehringer Ingelheim has produced its first results: the two partners have jointly identified a biomarker that will allow the testing of active substances on a diabetes-related protein. The results, which have now been published in the Journal of Biomolecular Screening, prove the added value of collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and academia in researching new drugs for the treatment of diabetes and atherosclerosis (Journal of Biomolecular Screening).

Read more...

CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have discovered how a protein in immune cells plays an essential role in their development by repairing DNA damage - and if this protein is missing lymphomas can form.

The research, published online in Cancer Cell today, showed that the protein, called ATMIN, acts as a cell’s ‘mechanic’ looking out for damage in DNA. When it spots damage, ATMIN prompts the cell to repair the DNA by recruiting another protein called ATM.

But without ATMIN, B cells do not recognise DNA damage and are unable to activate ATM to begin repairs. Instead the cell attempts to use different repair processes not designed to mend this damage.

This botched repair results in mistakes, causing parts of the DNA structure to be permanently damaged through deletions, gaps and breaks in the sequence. And as these cancer causing changes to the DNA structure accumulate, B cell lymphomas form.

Lead researcher, Dr Axel Behrens from Cancer Research UK’s London Research Institute, said: “Our findings reveal more about how this cellular ‘mechanic’ keeps DNA damage in check in the cell. ATM normally responds to changes in chromatin – the structure that packages the DNA into the cell – by repairing damage. Or if the damage can’t be repaired, ATM prevents the cell from replicating and ‘scraps’ the cell. But, critically ATM can only work if switched on by ATMIN.”

The researchers also found that ATMIN appears to play a role in human B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). It is present only at very low levels in B-ALL cells compared to normal cells, suggesting that these findings could have a real impact on understanding the disease.

Dr Julie Sharp, senior science information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Revealing the inner workings of cells is essential to understanding how cancers develop. Understanding the role that ATMIN plays will be crucial in developing new and better treatments for lymphomas.”

Read more...

Gaining more than the recommended weight during pregnancy can put women at increased risk of becoming obese and developing related health problems, including high blood pressure, later in life.

Read more...

Roche’s investigational personalised medicine showed promising final Phase II results in people with a form of lung cancer.

Read more...

Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that a common gene fault in cervical cancer cells triggers a ripple of molecular signals - which makes the disease more aggressive, according to research published in The Journal of Pathology, today.

Read more...

Engineers at Brown University and in India have a promising new approach to treating heart-attack victims. The researchers created a nanopatch with carbon nanofibers and a polymer. In laboratory tests, natural heart-tissue cell density on the nanoscaffold was six times greater than the control sample, while neuron density had doubled. Results are published in Acta Biomaterialia. 

Read more...

New research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Urology Association (AUA) in Washington, DC demonstrates that holmium laser therapy is a safe and durable treatment option for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) - an enlargement of the prostate that affects most men as they age. The study, conducted by researchers from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), is the longest comprehensive assessment of this technology to date, and researchers suggest it may now safely be considered the new, size independent, gold standard for treatment of BPH.

Read more...

New study reveals biological reasons for feelings of anxiety instead of reward in patients with anorexia.

Read more...

PASADENA, Calif.—A team of researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and the University of Louisville have used a stimulating electrode array to assist a paralyzed man to stand, step on a treadmill with assistance, and, over time, to regain voluntary movements of his limbs. The electrical signals provided by the array, the researchers have found, stimulate the spinal cord's own neural network so that it can use the sensory input derived from the legs to direct muscle and joint movements.

Read more...

Wolbachia are bacteria that infect many insects, including mosquitoes. However, Wolbachia do not naturally infect Anopheles mosquitoes, which are the type that spreads malaria to humans. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that artificial infection with different Wolbachia strains can significantly reduce levels of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in the mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. The investigators also determined that one of the Wolbachia strains rapidly killed the mosquito after it fed on blood. According to the researchers, Wolbachia could potentially be used as part of a strategy to control malaria if stable infections can be established in Anopheles. Their study is published in the May 19 edition PLoS Pathogens.

Read more...

Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that stopping prostate cancer cells from ‘bulking up’ with nutrients reduces the spread of the disease and tumour size, according to research published today in EMBO Journal.

Read more...

There really, actually, truly, factually, legitimately is a growing interest in living in more environmentally sensitive buildings.  Even still, whether you’re looking for a single family home, urban townhome, downtown loft, or warehouse loft, the players in the green development field are few and far between (but increasing).  I noticed an interesting developer that is building the "first ‘zero energy’ sustainable mixed-use building in Las Vegas."  This green development, called the Green Valley Lofts, is minutes from the Vegas strip and neighbors all the urban amenities one could ask for (gym, restaurants, banks, dry cleaner, car wash, etc.).  It’s lined to be LEED Certified, too. 

Read more...

Green Wombat reports that the Governator was pumping up California’s commitment to create 3,000 megawatts of new solar-produced, clean energy by 2017.  Think about that.  We’re talking about governmental support for empowering and supporting residents to generate their own energy.  Relatedly, the Solar Umbrella House is a modern + green example of what can happen when home owners take advantage of the governmental benefits of clean energy subsidization.  It was an AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Project in 2006, by architect Pugh + Scarpa.  What more can I say than that the Solar Umbrella House looks good and sunlight provides 95% of the electricity (less than $300 /year in energy bills). 

Read more...

Over-activation of a single gene promotes leukemia, but its loss causes liver cancer.

Read more...

The mass extinction of marine life in our oceans during prehistoric times is a warning that the Earth will see such an extinction again because of high levels of greenhouse gases, according to new research by geologists.

Read more...

CSIRO scientists have shown that a new experimental vaccine helps to protect horses against the deadly Hendra virus.

Read more...

The planetary system around the red dwarf Gliese 581, one of the closest stars to the Sun in the galaxy, has been the subject of several studies aiming to detect the first potentially habitable exoplanet. Two candidates have already been discarded, but a third planet, Gliese 581d, can be considered the first confirmed exoplanet that could support Earth-like life. This is the conclusion of a team of scientists from the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (CNRS, UPMC, ENS Paris, Ecole Polytechnique) in Paris, France, whose study is published today in “The Astrophysical Journal Letters”.

Read more...

Cancer Research UK scientists have revealed that classifying tumours according to their levels of chromosomal instability could improve predictions for patient survival, helping doctors plan treatment strategies. The research is published in Cancer Research (15 May 2011).

Read more...

    Phase III studies show once-daily Onbrez Breezhaler plus tiotropium improved lung function (measured by trough FEV1) by up to 230 mL from baseline[1] Reported incidence of side effects was similar in both treatment groups[1] Results add to comprehensive data supporting Onbrez Breezhaler as an effective treatment for COPD with good safety profile

Basel, May 15, 2011 - Results of two Phase III studies show that once-daily Onbrez® Breezhaler® (indacaterol) plus tiotropium produced a significantly greater improvement in lung function than tiotropium alone in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)[1], supporting current treatment guidelines which recommend use of one or more bronchodilators for treating moderate-to-severe disease[2]. The reported incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events was similar in both treatment groups[1].

Read more...

Nowadays, everyday life would be inconceivable without nanotechnology. It is also ever-present in medical technology – both in therapy and diagnostics. Researchers from ETH Zurich have now prepared silver nanoparticles in an interdisciplinary study in such a way that they offer further potential in this field.

Read more...

Researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered a way to "amp up" the power of killer T cells known as CD8 cells in the immune system, making them more functional for longer periods of time and boosting their ability to multiply and expand within the body to fight melanoma.

Read more...

NYU Cancer Institute Researchers Identify Novel Mutations in a Cell Communication Pathway.

Read more...

Research at the Medical Research Council (MRC) has highlighted genes in the bacterium Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that may help the superbug to survive after it has been targeted by antibacterial agents. This discovery could inform the development of future drugs to overcome MRSA’s defence systems.

Read more...

Scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy have discovered an explanation of how stroke patients can achieve better recovery. A hormone that is associated with the growth hormone system has proved to benefit recovery during the later phases of rehabilitation after a stroke.

Read more...

Scientists at the University of Glasgow have identified a potential target for the treatment of schizophrenia.

Read more...

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS) primarily affect children and adolescents[1],[2] Approval based on Phase II US study of 28 patients showing 75% of patients had 30% or greater reduction in the size of their largest SEGA at six months[3] Prior to the approval of Votubia, brain surgery was the only treatment option in Switzerland for patients with growing SEGAs[4] Worldwide regulatory submissions for everolimus to treat this patient population are under way; first approval received in the US in 2010 as Afinitor®

Basel, May 11, 2011 - Swissmedic, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products, has approved Votubia® (everolimus) tablets* for the treatment of patients 3 years of age and older, with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with tuberous sclerosis (TS), for whom surgery is not a suitable option[3]. Votubia is the first medication approved in Switzerland to treat these patients, who are primarily children and adolescents[1],[2]. In the US, everolimus is approved for patients with SEGA under the trade name Afinitor® tablets[5].

Read more...

Green Life Design

I’ve used the analogy before, but living the green life is similar to using web widgets–you try one out, figure out how it works, and start to enjoy the benefits of that new widget’s functionality.  How about trying the green artwork widget?  Artwork can be green, too.  Depending on what you’re looking for, you may want to hunt down FSC-certified wood frames or commission your favorite artist and have the piece done with eco-friendly paints.  Get creative and find a way to make your art green (i. e., use water-based paints as opposed to oil, etc.).  OR…you could also buy some of Campbell Laird‘s work. 

Read more...

It’s official, I’m a water genius.  I had a hard time with the question on the lawn mower, but other than that, I scored a near perfect 11/12, which means I have a water IQ of 165.  That’s certifiable water genius status.  I’m joking a little, but water is a serious thing.  Growing up, I used to think water was free, but the reality is all too different.  If you’ve ever read the book Dune, by Frank Herbert, you can imagine how life is with a water shortage.  By the way, I don’t think I could wear one of those suits!  Anyway, I live in Texas because it’s big and has many things in abundance, but we need to keep it that way…let’s get serious about our water supply and act collectively. 

Read more...

Today’s a day when I feel pride as an SMU Mustang.  I was taking my little pooch, Colt, to the vet for his yearlies, when I saw a HUGE wing from a wind turbine with the logo "www. vestas. com."  I’ve never seen one of those up close, but it was tons bigger than I thought it would be.  Anyway, Governor Perry and tons of other private companies came to SMU to announce a partnership to invest $10 billion dollars in new wind energy infrastructure.  The partners include:  AES Wind Generation; Airtricity, Inc.; Babcock & Brown, L. P.; Gamesa Energy Southwest; Horizon Wind Energy; John Deere Wind Energy; Orion Energy L. L.C.; PPM Energy; Renewable Energy Systems (USA); Shell Wind Energy Inc.; Superior Renewable Energy; D. H. Blattner; GE Energy L. L.C.; Mortenson; Siemens; Trinity Structural Towers, Inc.; and Vestas-Americas Inc. 

Read more...

Being Texas-OU weekend, I thought I would bring it back to Austin for a little environmental action.  Back in late September, an environmental organization called Austin Green Art created "Cup City" for the Austin City Limits Music Festival.  The enormous temporary art installation was sponsored by Starbucks.  Cup City should be noticed not for what it is, but what it illustrates. 

Read more...

About one year ago yesterday, Hunt Consolidated Inc. broke ground on a new office tower, which borders on Akard Street and Woodall Rogers Freeway.  You’ve probably seen it, it has massive cement beams curving on its northerly face.  The building is being developed by Woodbine Development Corporation, which is partially owned somehow in the Hunt Consolidated Empire.  I heard from a friend (hearsay, I know) that Chairman Ray Hunt, or some other c-level executive, was asked at a luncheon whether the building was going to be green and he equivocated saying something like, "Well, we’re not going to build green just to build green, but we’ll do it if there are tangible economic reasons to do it."

Read more...

This building is a little old hat for many of the readers here (it was an AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Project in 2004), but I think there are some important aspects of the projects that can be remembered and applied to new green projects.  This building is in the highest eschelon of LEED ratings, the platinum standard (LEED-NC, v2), and if you follow the links below, they’ve been generous enough to explain how they received all the points towards Platinum certification.  You can even take a virtual tour of the building if you’re interested. 

Read more...

The handsome Hearst Tower skyscraper achieved LEED Gold accreditation from the USGBC–it’s the first to be recognized as such in New York City.  The building architect is the famous Norman Foster, and this is the third time for Jetson Green to feature one of his buildings (30 St Mary Axe + WTC 200 Greenwich).  Norman Foster is literally one of the leading architects in the modern/contemporary + green building field.  This building is particularly bold for its environmental mission: it used 80% recycled steel and will consume 25% less energy than its skyscraper counterparts. 

Read more...

Absolute Architectural Splendor.  There’s a little bit of green development in Dallas, but we can do more to catch up to other progressive cities such as Portland + Austin.  Azure, a 375-foot condo in Dallas being developed by the innovative Gabriel Barbier-Mueller of Harwood International (+ Westback Projects Corporation), is Dallas’ first foray into LEED, green living, as far as residential condo development is concerned.  Azure is on track to receive the LEED gold certification from the USGBC, but it is trying to get platinum.  Really, all that matters is that this place will be green + modern. 

Read more...

Eco Info
Powered by Joomla CMS.